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Quark Index

A quark index is relevant because it is often more convenient to use a number instead of a letter to represent different kinds of quarks. So consider a seed noted by Z where

\mathsf{Z} \in \{ \mathsf{U, D, E, G, M, A, T, B, S, }  \mathsf{C,  \; } Ⓐ, Ⓑ, Ⓘ, Ⓦ, Ⓓ, Ⓛ }

The seed Z can be used to define an ordinary quark written as \mathsf{z} \equiv \{ \, \mathsf{Z}, \mathsf{O} \, \} and its associated anti-quark \overline{\mathsf{z}} \equiv \{ \, \mathsf{Z}, \overline{\mathsf{O}} \, \}. These quarks are occasionally referred to using \zeta, the Greek letter zeta, as shown in the table below. When used like this, zeta is called a quark index. The two particles  \mathsf{z} and  \overline{\mathsf{z}} are sometimes collectively called \zeta-type or Z-type quarks. This notation is especially helpful when using summation notation in formulae.

IndexSeedQuark
 \zetaZz
1Uu
2Dd
3Ee
4Gg
5Mm
6Aa
7Tt
8Bb
9Ss
10Cc
11a
12b
13i
14w
15d
16l
The quark index notes a level of detailed analysis reminiscent of this Sumatran tampan.
Twenty Dragon Tampan (detail), Paminggir people. Lampung region of Sumatra 19th century, 65 x 81 cm. From the library of Darwin Sjamsudin, Jakarta. Photograph by D Dunlop.