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Charge Symmetry

Let particle P be described by a chain of events where the quarks in each orbital cycle \mathsf{\Omega} can be parsed into two sets

\mathsf{\Omega}^{\mathsf{P}}  =  \left\{ \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Uparrow}}  \,   ,   \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Downarrow}} \right\}

that have opposite magnetic polarities

\delta_{\widehat{m}}  \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Uparrow}} \right)  =  - \, \delta_{\widehat{m}} \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Downarrow}} \right) = \pm 1

Then \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Uparrow}} and \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Downarrow}} are called the northern and southern components of P. When these two components have the same charge  q then the outcome of any calculation using the charge is not affected by a change of polarity. The magnetic polarity is used to specify direction on the magnetic axis. So for particles like P, the charge distribution along the magnetic axis is symmetric. Descriptions of phenomena associated with the charge of P are unaltered by any confusion or mix-up between north and south. This indifference is useful, so if

q \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Uparrow}} \right)  =  q \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\Downarrow}} \right)

then we say that P has charge-symmetry on the magnetic-axis. See the quark model of atomic hydrogen for an example of this kind of symmetry.

Redness is illustrated by this icon for visual sensations that are reddish or greenish.

Sensory interpretation: Magnetic polarity can be interpreted as a description of if a visual sensation is more reddish or greenish. So for a particle with charge-symmetry on the magnetic-axis, the charge distribution does not depend on how the particle is objectified from red and green sensations. This symmetry relieves us from having to pay very much attention to whether a sensation is red or green.

Charge symmetry on the magnetic axis is suggested by the red and green beads of this baby carrier from Borneo.
Baby carrier panel, Bahau people. Borneo 20th century, 29 x 26 cm. Photograph by D Dunlop.

Charge Symmetry on the Electric Axis

Alternatively, let P be described by a chain of events where the quarks in each orbital cycle \mathsf{\Omega} can be parsed into two sets

\mathsf{\Omega}^{\mathsf{P}}  =  \left\{  \mathsf{P}_{\large{\oplus}} ,   \mathsf{P}_{\large{\ominus}} \right\}

that have opposite electric polarities

\delta_{\widehat{e}} \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\oplus}} \right)  =- \, \delta_{\widehat{e}} \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\ominus}} \right) =  \pm 1

Then \mathsf{P}_{\large{\oplus}} and \mathsf{P}_{\large{\ominus}} are called the positive and negative components of P. When these two components have the same charge  q then the outcome of any calculation using the charge is not affected by a change of polarity. The electric polarity is used to specify direction on the electric axis. So for particles like P, the charge distribution along the electric axis is symmetric. Descriptions of phenomena associated with the charge of P are unaltered by any confusion or mix-up between positive and negative components. This indifference is useful, so if

q \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\oplus}} \right)  =  q \left( \mathsf{P}_{\large{\ominus}} \right)

then we say that P has charge-symmetry on the electric-axis. See this quark model of an electron for an example of electric-axis charge-symmetry.

Yellowness is illustrated by this icon for visual sensations that are yellowish or bluish.

Sensory interpretation: Electric polarity can be understood as a binary description of if a complex visual sensation is more yellowish or blueish. So for a particle with charge-symmetry on the electric-axis, the charge distribution does not depend on how the particle is objectified from yellow and blue sensations. This symmetry relieves us from having to pay very much attention to whether a sensation is yellow or blue.